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Investment Center

Tell us where you want to go. We'll help you get there.

Taxes Perhaps you're just starting out, beginning to build the foundation for your future. Or, maybe you're an empty nester, with the newfound freedom to travel and pursue lifelong dreams. Or, you might be nearing retirement, hoping to maintain a comfortable lifestyle while ensuring you won't outlive your savings.
 
Whatever your stage of life, a TCU Investment Services Representative can help, with top-notch financial and investment advice and a full spectrum of investment tools and options designed to help you achieve your dreams.
 
TCU Investment Services Representatives have the depth of knowledge and the breadth of experience to help you get where you want to go. With a full range of offerings, we will help you choose the investment options that will help you best reach your financial goals.
 
At TCU Investment Services, we've built a wealth of trust with you. Now, trust us to help you build your wealth. To arrange a no-cost, no-obligation meeting, simply contact a TCU Investment Services Representative.

Securities sold, advisory services offered through CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc. (CBSI), member FINRA/SIPC, a registered broker/dealer and investment advisor. CBSI is under contract with the financial institution to make securities available to members. Not NCUA/NCUSIF/FDIC insured, May Lose Value, No Financial Institution Guarantee. Not a deposit of any financial institution. 10003787-0613

 

Tax Efficient Investing - A Smart Choice

Taxes can take a chunk out of your investment returns. Employing some of these strategies could help you retain more of your potential investment earnings and lessen your tax burden.

Buy and Hold
Following a buy-and-hold strategy for your stock investments may save on taxes in the long run. Not only do you postpone taxes the longer you hold, if you hold your investment long enough, your gains might be subject to the lower capital gains tax rate. Capital gains are generally taxed 15% on the investments you hold longer than one year. Gains on investments you've owned one year or less are taxed at your regular federal income-tax rate.

Consider Tax-Exempt Investments
Tax-exempt investments, such as municipal bonds, give you income that is generally exempt from federal and often state and local income tax. If you prefer income over growth, municipal bonds may be a good choice.
 
Take Advantage of Qualified Plans
Participating in an employer's 401(k) or 403(b) plan reduces your tax obligation because your contributions are not considered part of your taxable income in the year you make them. Additionally, taxes on your earnings are deferred until you withdraw funds from your plan.

Explore IRAs
IRAs are another option to consider, but you need to determine if your contributions to a regular IRA may be tax deductible. Roth IRAs are slightly different. Although contributions to a Roth IRA are not deductible, account earnings are tax deferred and can ultimately be withdrawn from the Roth IRA income-tax free provided certain conditions are met.
 
Invest Tax Smart
Keeping as much of your hard-earned money as possible is the goal of tax efficient investing. We can help you explore all the ways you can invest with the goal of minimizing taxes.
 
If you would like additional information on how to lessen your tax burden contact a TCU Investment Services Representative.


Representative is not a tax advisor or legal expert. For information regarding specific tax situations, please contact a tax professional. For legal advice, consult an attorney.
 
Representatives are registered, securities are sold, and investment advisory services offered through CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc. (CBSI), member FINRA/SIPC, a registered broker/dealer and investment advisor, 2000 Heritage Way, Waverly, Iowa 50677, toll-free (866) 512-6109. Nondeposit investment and insurance products are not federally insured, involve investment risk, may lose value and are not obligations of or guaranteed by the financial institution. CBSI is under contract with the financial institution, through the financial services program, to make securities available to members.
 
FR040818-8576

 

Bearish Thoughts Persist in a Bull Market

Many At the end of October, the S&P 500 was up 24.39% in the past 12 months. What investor wouldn't want gains like that? As uplifting as that market advance was for many, some baby boomers missed out because they were simply too afraid to get back into stocks.
 
Would most boomers take a 4% return instead? Earlier this year, the multinational investment firm Allianz surveyed Americans with more than $200,000 in investable assets. Allianz found that for most of these people, protecting retirement savings was financial priority number one. Aversion to risk ran high: 76% of the respondents said that they would prefer an investment vehicle that offered a 4% return with no chance of loss of principal over an investment that offered an 8% return without principal protection.
 
In the equity markets, risk and reward are not easily divorced. They come together in an imperfect marriage, a problematic one but it is one you may need to put up with if you are seeking decent yields. With interest rates so minimal, fixed-rate, risk-averse investing can put you at a disadvantage even against mild inflation. If you turn your back on equity investing right now, you could find yourself thwarting the potential for your retirement savings.
 
Psychology froze some boomers out of the Wall Street rebound. The awful stock market slide of 2008-09 left many midlife investors skittish about stocks. As Wall Street history goes, that was an extraordinary, aberrational stretch of market behavior. These events, and the fears that followed, may have scared certain investors away from stocks for years to come.
 
What price risk aversion? At the end of the third quarter, more than $8 trillion was sitting in U.S. money market accounts, doing basically nothing. It wasn't being lost, but it sure wasn't returning much. In the Allianz survey, 80% of baby boomers polled viewed the stock market as volatile; 38% said that volatility was prompting them to keep some or all of their cash on the sidelines.
 
While all that money isn't being exposed to risk, it is also bringing investors meager rewards. Consider the psychology of our society for a moment. Generation after generation is told to save and invest for future objectives, most prominently a comfortable retirement. That need, that purpose, is not going away. As long as that societal need is in place, people are likely predisposed to believe in the potential of equity investing. So there is a collective American psychology — as yet unshaken — that the stock market is a strong option for investing, making money and building wealth. The same unshaken assumption remains in the housing market, even after everything homeowners have been through.
That powerful collective psychology has contributed to the longevity of bull markets and it isn't going away. We had the bulk of the federal government shut down for 16 days last month, and yet the S&P 500 gained 4.46% in October. After 10 months of 2013, the index was up 23.16% YTD and this is a year that has brought fears of a conflagration in the Middle East, the threat of a U.S. credit rating downgrade and a fiscal cliff, sequester cuts, a banking crisis in Cyprus that scared the international financial community and continued high unemployment. Stocks have vaulted past all of it.
 
Consider the view from this wide historical window: in the last 10 years, the S&P 500 has averaged more than a 7% annual return, even with its appalling 47% drop from October 2007 to March 2009. Since 1926, the S&P has a) had 23 years where it returned 10% or better, b) never gone negative over a 20-year period and c) advanced 8 to 10% a year on average.
 
If you bought and held, congratulations. If you opted for tactical asset allocation during the downturn, facing that risk paid off. The point is: You stayed in the market. You didn't cash out in late 2008 or early 2009 and decide to buy back at the top (as some bearish investors have recently done).
 
It is not time to throw caution to the wind. The Federal Reserve is not going to keep easing forever; QE3 will eventually end, perhaps early in 2014, and when it does Wall Street will react. The market may price it in, or we may see something worse happen. When you look at all the hurdles this bull market has overcome in the past few years, however, you have to think there is at least a bit more upside to come. Wall Street is optimistic and the performance of stocks certainly demonstrates that optimism, even as bearish thoughts persist.

If you have any questions about your investments, or you would like additional information about investing and preparing for your financial future, please contact a TCU Investment Services Representative.
Securities sold, advisory services offered through CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc. (CBSI), member FINRA/SIPC , a registered broker/dealer and investment advisor.CBSI is under contract with the financial institution to make securities available to members.
Not NCUA/NCUSIF/FDIC insured, May Lose Value, No Financial Institution Guarantee. Not a deposit of any financial institution.
 
This material was prepared by MarketingLibrary.Net Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. Please note - investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.
  
Citations.
1 - money.cnn.com/data/markets/sandp/ [10/31/13]
2 - foxbusiness.com/personal-finance/2013/10/24/wall-streets-rallying-so-why-are-boomers-so-scared/ [10/24/13]
3 - business.time.com/2013/09/27/seeking-shelter-from-stock-swings-savers-take-on-a-different-kind-of-risk/ [9/27/13]
  
 

Do I Save for My Retirement or My Children's Education? 

Many Americans are facing a difficult choice. Do they save for their own retirement or save for their children's education? Here are some things to think about when wrestling with this decision.

Are you fully paying for, or helping to pay for college?
Some parents decide that their kids should contribute financially to their own education because they will better appreciate the value of their college education. Other parents ask their kids to contribute to their education because they cannot afford to bear the expense completely. In either case, this can make a big difference in the amount you need to save for your retirement.

Is it one or the other?
If there just isn't enough disposable income each month to fund both your children's education and your own retirement, many financial experts agree that retirement funding should be your first priority. Here's why:

Your children can always borrow money to go to school. You can't borrow to retire. Your children have decades ahead of them after they graduate to make money and pay their loans back. You have decades ahead of you where your savings need to support you.

Additionally, your children have the option to work through college and take longer than the traditional four years. You may be forced to retire early due to unplanned circumstances.

A personal decision...
If you cannot fully fund both your retirement and savings goals, your first step should be to work with a financial advisor who can help you make the right choices for your personal circumstances and maximize the potential of what you can invest.

If you have any questions, or would like to provide feedback, regarding the information presented in this article, contact a TCU Investment Services Representative.
 

Representative is not a tax advisor or legal expert. For information regarding specific tax situations, please contact a tax professional. For legal advice, consult an attorney.
Securities sold, advisory services offered through CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc. (CBSI), member FINRA/SIPC , a registered broker/dealer and investment advisor. CBSI is under contract with the financial institution to make securities available to members. Not NCUA/NCUSIF/FDIC insured, May Lose Value, No Financial Institution Guarantee. Not a deposit of any financial institution.
FR040818-7E59 

When You Change Jobs, Should You Change Your 401(k)?

Job transitions can be stressful. During periods of change, it is easy to forget one of the most important decisions you have to make: What should you do with your qualified retirement savings, such as your 401(k)?
 
Know the consequences of taking your money out of your retirement savings. This may include (but are not limited to) the following:

 

  • 20% Withholding: Your employer is required to withhold 20% of the total amount to cover any potential Federal taxes you might owe. Keep in mind, you may owe more than the 20% that is withheld.
  • Potential Tax Implications: You are subject to Federal and State income taxes on both tax-deductible contributions and tax-deferred growth.
  • 10% Penalty: Early withdrawal penalties of 10% may apply if you are age 59 1/2 or younger.

 
Keep Your Retirement Money Working
If you would like to keep more of your retirement savings growing tax-deferred and minimize your current tax bill, there are options to consider. You can consolidate your retirement savings into one IRA. By transferring your retirement plan to an IRA, you have the ability to consolidate several different IRAs into a single retirement savings account.
 

Understanding Your Options
Review and discuss your options with an experienced Financial Advisor. Together you can identify a solution that will work for your needs today and throughout your retirement.

If you have any questions, or would like to provide feedback, regarding the information presented in this article, contact a TCU Investment Services Representative.
 

Representative is not a tax advisor or legal expert. For information regarding specific tax situations, please contact a tax professional. For legal advice, consult an attorney.
Securities sold, advisory services offered through CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc. (CBSI), member FINRA/SIPC , a registered broker/dealer and investment advisor. CBSI is under contract with the financial institution to make securities available to members. Not NCUA/NCUSIF/FDIC insured, May Lose Value, No Financial Institution Guarantee. Not a deposit of any financial institution.
FR011302-8B5D 0113 

The Right Income Plan for Your Retirement

For many Americans, their retirement plan is primarily focused on saving and growing as much income as possible by the time they retire. Ask people about their plans once they retire and you will hear dreams of travel, family or their "next" career. However, you seldom hear about their retirement income plan.

It is important to build a retirement income plan that will allow you to turn your many years of savings into a reliable and sustainable paycheck throughout your retirement.

There are several factors to consider when building your retirement income plan:

Choose the Right Age to Start Taking Your Social Security Income
It is important to ensure that you are maximizing your Social Security benefit by choosing the right age to start your benefits based on your employment, health, and income needs.
 

Diversify Your Taxes
The three most common tax treatments are taxable, tax deferred and tax free accounts. Since tax laws and rates are likely to change during retirement, it can be prudent to establish multiple retirement income sources with varied tax treatments.

Determine a Realistic Withdrawal Rate
One of the key questions you need to ask yourself is: How much can I take from my retirement accounts? As a general rule, you can withdraw 3% to 5% every year without undue concerns about running out of money.*
 

Take Advantage of New Resources
As millions of baby boomers begin to enter retirement, there are more resources than ever before to help you build your retirement income plan. To better understand and evaluate these resources, contact a TCU Investment Services Representative. Together, you can develop a retirement income strategy that can support all of your retirement goals and dreams.
If you have any questions, or would like to provide feedback, regarding the information presented in this article, contact a TCU Investment Services Representative.


*Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics by the U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 Consumer Expenditure Survey. Based on a 30-year retirement.
Representative is not a tax advisor or legal expert. For information regarding specific tax situations, please contact a tax professional. For legal advice, consult an attorney.
Securities sold, advisory services offered through CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc. (CBSI), member FINRA/SIPC , a registered broker/dealer and investment advisor. CBSI is under contract with the financial institution to make securities available to members. Not NCUA/NCUSIF/FDIC insured, May Lose Value, No Financial Institution Guarantee. Not a deposit of any financial institution.
FR061021-907E

 

Increase Contributions to Build a Bigger Nest Egg.

Contributing to a 401(k), 403(b) or an IRA (individual retirement account) is a sure-fire way to help you save for retirement. The money you contribute—aided by tax advantages—grows, and most likely it will increase substantially by the time you need it. If your employer matches your 401(k) contribution, take advantage of the free money by making your own contribution.
You'd be at an even greater advantage if you make regular, incremental increases to these accounts throughout your working years. The earlier you start, the better the payoff; it could be substantial to building yourself a bigger nest egg. See chart below for an example:
 

Age
401(k) Contribution
By Age 60
30
Starts at 5% - Keeps the contribution at 5% for 30 years
$305,865
30
Starts at 5% - Increases contribution by 1% each year for the first 10 years, and then keeps the contribution at 15% for the remaing 20 years
$694,133*

Both examples assume an average portfolio return of 8%, with a mixture of stocks and bonds.
*More than doubles the nest egg.
Contact a TCU Investment Services Representative if you have any questions.

 

 

How late is too late to start saving for retirement?

This question is difficult because the answer depends on your income and assets, your goals for retirement and many other factors. Ideally, you should begin saving for retirement in your 20's. More time to save, enhances your chances of having the kind of retirement lifestyle you want.

If you're in your 40's or older and haven't saved much (or anything) yet, you may face a challenge in building the retirement fund you need. The shorter your time frame, the less room you have for error. But don't panic - it's never too late to start saving. You may still be able to secure a comfortable retirement for yourself, but it may require you to make some tough choices. Here are a few tips if you're getting a late start:

  • Save as much as possible: The more you save, the more you'll have when you retire. Try to maximize your contributions to IRAs, 401(k)s, and other tax-advantaged vehicles. Then supplement your retirement fund with mutual funds, savings accounts, and other investments.
  • Cut current expenses: Chances are, not all of your expenses are absolutely essential. If you can wipe out or trim certain expenses, such as videos, expensive coffees, and daily lunches out, you'll free up more money to invest in your retirement.
  • Invest more aggressively: This can help you build a large retirement fund in a short time. Certain stocks and mutual funds may enable your savings to grow more rapidly. The tradeoff: These investments are subject to market risks, which will expose you to greater volatility, including a possible loss of principal.
  • Delay retirement: You may have no choice but to delay your retirement until after age 65. This strategy will buy you more time to build your nest egg. Plus, the more years you work, the fewer years of retirement you'll have to fund.
  • Rethink your retirement goals: Set more realistic goals for your retirement (no beach house on the Riviera, for example). That way, you won't need as much money to fund your retirement.

If you fear you're getting too late of a start, or you're not sure where to start, consult a financial professional. He or she can help you map out a plan to bridge the gap between where you are now and where you need to be when you retire.

Set up an appointment today with a TCU Investment Services Representative.

 

 

The Right Income Plan for Your Retirement
Retirement can last 30 years or longer. To make sure that you have a comfortable income for the length of your retirement, it is important to build a retirement income plan that will allow you to turn your many years of savings into a reliable and sustainable retirement paycheck.

Choose the Right Age to Start Taking Your Social Security Income
Social Security represents a significant portion of many retirees’ incomes. As a result, it is important to ensure you
are maximizing your Social Security benefit by choosing the right age to start your benefits. For those born between 1943-1954, the age when you can receive your full Social Security benefit is 66. However, you can begin your Social Security payments earlier or later than age 66. The choice is yours. Either choice will have a noticeable impact on your income today and in the future. The decision to start receiving Social Security income is a personal one based
on employment, health and income needs.
 
Diversify Your Taxes
Take a quick look at your retirement savings and you may see accounts and investments with different tax statuses. The three most common tax treatments are; taxable, tax deferred and tax free accounts. Since tax laws and rates are likely to change during retirement, it can be prudent to establish multiple retirement income sources with varied tax treatments. This approach gives you and your family the flexibility to work with your Financial and Tax Advisors to find ways to optimize your income choices and minimize your taxes as tax laws change.
 
Determine a Realistic Withdrawal Rate
One of the key questions you need to ask yourself is: “How much can I take from my retirement accounts?” As a general rule, you can withdraw 3% to 5% every year without undue concerns about running out of money.* When making your retirement income plans, make sure your calculations do not stray too far from this useful rule of thumb.

If you have any questions or would like to provide feedback regarding the information presented in this article, please contact a TCU Investment Services Representative.
 
*Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics by the U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 Consumer Expenditure Survey. Based on a 30-year retirement.

 
 
 
 


 

Do I Save for My Retirement or My Children’s Education?
Many Americans are facing a difficult choice. Do they save for their own retirement or save for their children’s education? Here are some things to think about when wrestling with this decision.

 


Are You Paying for College or Helping to Pay?
Some parents decide their kids should contribute financially to their own education because they will better appreciate the value of their college education. Other parents ask their children to contribute to their education because they cannot afford to bear the expense completely. In either case, this can make a big difference in the amount you need to save for your retirement.

When It’s One or the Other
What happens when there just isn’t enough disposable income each month to fund both your children’s education and your own retirement?  Many financial experts agree that retirement funding should be your first priority. Here’s why: Your kids can always borrow money to go to school. You can’t borrow to retire. Your kids have decades ahead of them after they graduate to make money and pay the loans back. You have decades ahead of you when your savings need to support you. Additionally, your kids can work through college and take longer than the traditional four years.  You may be forced to retire early due to poor health or a bad economy.

A Personal Decision
If you cannot fully fund both your retirement and savings goals, your first step should be to work with a financial advisor who can help you make the right choices for your personal circumstances and maximize the potential of what you can invest.

Contact a TCU Investment Services Representative for a no-cost, no-obligation Retirement Planning Consultation. Today is the best time to get started!

 

Tax Efficient Investing: A Smart Choice
Taxes can take a chunk out of your investment returns.  Employing some of these strategies could help you retain more of your potential investment earnings and lessen your tax burden.
 
Buy and Hold
Following a buy-and-hold strategy for your stock investments may save on taxes in the long run. Not only do you postpone taxes the longer you hold, if you hold your investment long enough, your gains might be subject to the lower capital gains tax rate. Capital gains are generally taxed at 15% on investments you hold longer than one year.  Gains on investments you've owned one year or less are taxed at your regular federal income-tax rate, which may be as high as 35% in 2008.
 

Consider Tax-Exempt Investments
Tax-exempt investments, such as municipal bonds, give you income that is generally exempt from Federal Income tax. If you want income rather than growth, municipal bonds may be a good choice.
 

Take Advantage of Qualified Plans
Participating in an employer's 401(k) or 403(b) plan reduces your tax obligation because your contributions are not considered part of your taxable income in the year you contribute to them. Additionally, taxes on your earnings are deferred until you withdraw funds from the plan.
 

Explore IRAs
IRAs are another option to consider, but you need to determine if your contributions to a regular IRA may be tax deductible. Roth IRAs are slightly different. Although contributions to a Roth IRA are not deductible, account earnings are tax deferred and can ultimately be withdrawn from the Roth IRA income-tax free provided certain conditions are met.
 

Invest Tax Smart
Keeping as much of your hard-earned money as possible is the goal of tax efficient investing. Your financial advisor can help you explore all the ways you can invest with the goal of minimizing taxes.


If you have any questions, or would like to provide feedback regarding the information presented in this article, contact a TCU Investment Services Representative.

 


 

What is an IRA?
A traditional individual retirement account or individual retirement annuity (IRA) is a personal savings plan that offers tax benefits to encourage retirement savings. You can contribute up to the lesser of $5,000 in 2010 and 2011, or 100 percent of your taxable compensation to a traditional IRA. In addition, individuals age 50 and older can make an extra "catch-up" contribution of $1,000 in 2010 and 2011. Funds in a traditional IRA grow tax deferred until they are withdrawn. Contributions may be fully or partially tax deductible, depending on certain factors.

 

Prerequisites

  • You have not reached age 70 1/2 during the year of the contribution
  • You have taxable compensation (i.e., wages, self-employment income) during the year
  • You can deduct the full amount of your contribution, provided that you are not covered by an employer-sponsored retirement plan
  • If you are covered by an employer-sponsored retirement plan, your IRA deduction (if any) depends on your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) and your federal income tax filing status. You will be entitled to a partial deduction in 2011 if your MAGI is less than:
  1. $66,000 if your filing status is single or head of household (less than or equal to $56,000 for a full deduction)  
  2. $110,000 if your filing status is married filing jointly (less than or equal to $90,000 for a full deduction) 
  3. $10,000 if your filing status is married filing separately (full deduction not available)  

Note: These income ranges are for the 2011 tax year, and are indexed for inflation.

Key Strengths

  • Deductible contributions are made on a pre-tax basis
  • Funds in traditional IRAs grow tax deferred until they are withdrawn
  • IRAs offer a wide range of investment choices
  • $1,171,650 (as of April 1, 2010) (and in some cases more) of IRA assets are protected in the event of bankruptcy under federal law

Key Tradeoffs

  • Your ability to deduct contributions may be reduced or eliminated if you are covered by an employer-sponsored retirement plan
  • Funds you withdraw from a traditional IRA are taxable income in the year received (to the extent the withdrawal consists of deductible contributions and investment earnings)
  • Withdrawals taken before age 59 1/2 may be subject to a 10 percent premature distribution tax (subject to certain exceptions)
  • Minimum annual withdrawals are required when you reach age 70 1/2 (required minimum distributions)
  • Taxable portion of distributions will be taxed at ordinary income rates, even if funds represent long-term capital gains or dividends paid on stock held within the IRA

Variations from State to State

  • States vary in their protection of IRAs from creditors
  • States differ in their tax treatment of IRAs

How Is It Implemented?

  • Open an IRA with a bank, financial institution, mutual fund company, life insurance company or stockbroker
  • Select types of investments to fund the IRA (e.g., CDs, mutual funds, annuities)
  • Make contributions up to the due date of your federal income tax return for that year (usually April 15 of the following year), not including extensions

Set up an appointment today with a TCU Investment Services Representative.
 

 

 

 

Members Financial Network is an Internet site which contains financial calculators, a financial library and access to on-line investing.

TCU Investment Services Representatives are not tax advisors. Representatives are registered, securities are sold, and investment advisory services offered through CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc. (CBSI), member FINRA http://www.finra.org/, /SIPC http://www.sipc.org/, a registered broker/dealer and investment advisor, 2000 Heritage Way, Waverly, Iowa 50677, toll-free (866) 512-6109. Nondeposit investment and insurance products are not federally insured, involve investment risk, may lose value and are not obligations of or guaranteed by the financial institution. CBSI is under contract with Teachers Credit Union, through TCU Investment Services, to make securities available to members. CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc., is a registered broker/dealer in all fifty states of the United States of America.

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 

 

Any links to external websites are links to alternative sites not operated by TCU. TCU is not responsible for the content of the alternate site. The privacy and security policies of the alternate site may differ from those practiced by TCU. TCU does not represent you or the third party if you enter into a transaction with the third party.

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